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Hebron drainage improved




Looking toward North Street, the old railroad culvert that restricted water flow is now gone. Concrete slabs from an old bridge have been repurposed as rip rap to provide the bank from erosion. Beacon photo by Charles Prince.

Looking toward North Street, the old railroad culvert that restricted water flow is now gone. Concrete slabs from an old bridge have been repurposed as rip rap to provide the bank from erosion. Beacon photo by Charles Prince.

HEBRON – One of the three culverts described in the village’s comprehensive flood study presented last March as ‘must be addressed’ is now open.

Gosnell Services of Hebron removed the old railroad bed culvert on the ditch that flows between the former Bowman Chevrolet property and the former Hebron Village Hall. That culvert and a portion of a former concrete bridge restricted water flow, causing flooding along North Street.

The drainage ditch flows through private property and village officials have been seeking permission to access the property for some time. Formal permission was received last Wednesday and the village moved quickly to get a contractor on the job.

Gosnell was the low bidder at $9980. Work started Monday and the ditch was wide open by noon Wednesday. Concrete from the old bridge was reused as rip rap to protect the bank from erosion.

The other two ‘must address’ culverts go under ODOT roads. Hebron officials tried to get ODOT to replace the culvert under U.S. 40 by the old village hall as part of the U.S. 40 repaving project this year. That effort was unsuccessful. Rebuilding a state highway over a new culvert is particularly expensive.

At the March presentation, principal consultant Brian Coghlan P.E. said the most surprising discovery was that widening and clearing the channels in town won’t solve flooding in Hebron.

The report listed three options:

1. Removing 11 culverts and replacing them with larger box culverts. Hartman estimated it could reduce flooding along ditches in Hebron by 2 – 2.5 feet for a 2012 flood. It is estimated as the most expensive option at $5.1 million.

2. Constructing a bypass channel to reroute some upstream water away from the village. It might be the least expensive option at $2.4 million. Hartman estimated it would reduce water levels from a 2012 flood by a maximum of 1.5 feet along most streams in Hebron.

• Construct a six foot deep, 10-acre detention basin to hold stormwater before it reaches most homes. It is called “potentially the best solution.” Hart- man’s estimate of its impact would be a maximum reduction of one foot from a 2012 flood. Its estimated cost is $3.9 million.

In other business at the October 12 council meeting, Village Administrator Ralph Wise reported that the lowest bid for a standby generator to keep the municipal complex running during a power outage exceeded the engineer’s estimate of $85,000 by 15 percent. Bids exceeding the estimate by more than 10 percent must be rebid. Council members approved his request to rebid after the engineer reviews the project scope and discusses the higher than expected bids with the contractors that responded.

Council members also authorized Wise to seek bids for the right to harvest at least two cuttings per year of hya for the next three years on 9.6 acre undeveloped portion of Evans Park. The three-year agreement that expires this year paid the village $800 a year and saved the village considerably more in labor and fuel since the area didn’t have to be mowed.

Wise also report that ODOT has approved the village’s agreement with Jobes Henderson to design the North High Street sidewalk project.


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