2013-07-20 / News

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Village of Hebron officials showed a group of Chinese exchange students a slice of Americana Tuesday afternoon. The students are from Wuhan University, which is the Ohio State University’s sister university in China. The Ohio Center for Cultural Exchange sponsored the students, who are visiting the United States through July 29. Hebron Administrator Ralph Wise said the OCCE may be accepting donated land in Hebron to construct a community garden, and OCCE officials thought the students, some of whom live in a city of 13 million people, would enjoy a taste of the American small town life during their stay at OSU’s main campus. Wise said he and Mayor Clifford Mason (in the above photo at the fish hatchery) joined the students as they visited the Hebron Fish Hatchery, Devine Farms, the Project Construction Company (Hebron’s old mill), and tried their hands at disc golf in Hebron’s Evans Park. They also dined at Clay’s Café and Hayman’s Dari-Bar. Wise said he hoped the students would see that American small towns need healthy local businesses to survive and maintain identity. “There are business owners who have been around for many years,” he said. “That’s what helps make a community.” Beacon photo by Scott Rawdon. Village of Hebron officials showed a group of Chinese exchange students a slice of Americana Tuesday afternoon. The students are from Wuhan University, which is the Ohio State University’s sister university in China. The Ohio Center for Cultural Exchange sponsored the students, who are visiting the United States through July 29. Hebron Administrator Ralph Wise said the OCCE may be accepting donated land in Hebron to construct a community garden, and OCCE officials thought the students, some of whom live in a city of 13 million people, would enjoy a taste of the American small town life during their stay at OSU’s main campus. Wise said he and Mayor Clifford Mason (in the above photo at the fish hatchery) joined the students as they visited the Hebron Fish Hatchery, Devine Farms, the Project Construction Company (Hebron’s old mill), and tried their hands at disc golf in Hebron’s Evans Park. They also dined at Clay’s Café and Hayman’s Dari-Bar. Wise said he hoped the students would see that American small towns need healthy local businesses to survive and maintain identity. “There are business owners who have been around for many years,” he said. “That’s what helps make a community.” Beacon photo by Scott Rawdon.

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