2012-09-29 / News

Joint bid cuts waste disposal costs

By Charles Prince

BALTIMORE - Residents will pay less next year for trash pickup, Village Administrator Scott Brown told village council members Monday night.

Thanks to a joint waste collection bid with the City of Pickeringon, residents will pay $8.75 per month for weekly service, down from the current $12.17 per month. Brown said the new joint contract will save Baltimore residents about $22,000 a year.

Work continues on some other cost saving projects. Council member Jim Hochradel said in the Service Committee report that the village can save $24,000 yet this year by signing a threeyear contract with an equipment company for a sludge press. The equipment, which will be operated by village employees, will allow the village to stockpile sludge on-site and then land apply it when conditions are most favorable.

Brown also reported that after several months of prodding, the primary manufacturer of the village’s wastewater treatment plant equipment has agreed to assess and then fix at no cost whatever is causing the equipment to use so much electricity. Representatives from General Electric will be at the plant next week.

Police Chief Michael Tussey reported that Baltimore is one of the two agencies in the area in the running for a new Dodge Charger police cruiser due to the department’s participation in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign. He also outlined five activity reports that started with an intoxicated father grabbing his son’s facemask as the teams were leaving the field after the Sept. 21 football game. Tussey said officers have been closely watching speed in the school zones, particularly on South Main Street, after receiving complaints about vehicles ignoring the 20 mph limit. The police reports are included in our Police Activity Reports starting on Page 7.

Village Solicitor Jeff Feyko said American Electric Power has agreed to two changes for the renewal of its franchise agreement with Baltimore. Hochradel said Service Committee members wanted to change the term of the new agreement from 25 years to five years. He believes there could be significant changes in how electricity is purchased in the next several years and wants the village to have flexibility to adapt. Hochradel also believes a much shorter terms ensures that some of the people involved in this decision will be around to explain their thoughts when the renewal comes up again. AEP also agreed to add sidewalks to the list of property that it will repair if damaged by its actions.

In his written report, Mayor Robert Kalish asked council members to approve two appointments which they did unanimously. Liberty Union-Thurston Elementary School teacher Tracy Farmer will serve out the rest of Shane Peck’s term on the Baltimore Parks & Recreation Board. Bob Griglick will serve the balance of Kyle Farmer’s term on the Board of Zoning Appeals. Both terms run through the end of the year.

Kalish reported that he personally and the village office has received numerous complaints about the Baltimore Festival Committee failing to remove the trailer used for the stage for weeks after the festival. He suggested that next year’s resolution allowing the use of Johnson Park include a requirement that all trucks/trailers and rides/concession trailers be removed within 72 hours after the festival closes on Saturday night. The committee was reported to be objecting to the 72-hour limit, seeking language that everything be moved in a “timely manner.” “We need to set an actual time,” Hochradel said and council members appeared to agree.

Kalish also reported that thanks to donations of $2,000 from Columbus -based Advocate for Kids and $500 from the Baltimore Rotary Club transportation services from Lancaster Public Transit will be available in 2013.

Kalish also reported that Trick or Treat will be from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25. Thurston’s celebration will be on the same night.

Council’s next regular meeting is set for 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 8, in the village hall.

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