2012-02-18 / Editorials & Letters

Writer wonders about Baltimore voters

Editor:

Much has been said about the November 2011 election, and I would like to discuss what I think is happening concerning the Baltimore voter and their overall happiness with the administration of this village.

Based on the 2010 U.S. Census, there are 2,996 people living in Baltimore where 550 are senior citizens and approximately 2,234 are of voting age. According to the Fairfield County Board of Elections, 2,013 residents of Baltimore are registered voters.

In the November 2011 election, only 1,005 voters cast their ballots, and we all know the results. The Baltimore Police levy was defeated by 643 no votes (64%) versus 362 yes votes (36%). With only 550 senior citizens living in Baltimore, and with no available knowledge of how many of the seniors are registered voters, there must be other voters that are also watching their finances.

When you review the final counting of the vote tally, some items should open some eyes. 1,005 voters cast their ballots for the Village Mayor and the two open Village Council positions. Mayor Kalish ran unopposed, but only received 744 votes (74%) of the total ballots. Councilman Tony House also ran unopposed and received 514 votes (51%) of the total ballots. Councilman Chuck Keller also ran unopposed and received 646 votes (64%).

When you run unopposed it would seem that there is a reason that you did not get 100% of the votes. Is it possible that the voters are beginning to feel that the Village Administrator, Village Mayor, and Village Council are allowing a governmental guru run the Village, create debt for the taxpayers, and do nothing to slow or stop this spending frenzy that has taken over our Village? It appears that the only way to stop it is to elect new leaders that will say no. When the 2010/2011 financial audit of the Village of Baltimore is completed, we will know more about what they have allowed to happen with the village’s outstanding debt.

Charles Lamb
Baltimore

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