2012-01-28 / Editorials & Letters

Village didn’t listen to the “no” votes

Editor:

The November 2011 election result does not seem to matter to the Baltimore Village Administration. Sixty-six percent of the voters said NO to the property tax increase to fund the expansion of the Baltimore Police Department.

In reviewing ordinances listed at BaltimoreOhio.org, you will find that on November 24, 2011 wording, ‘tax levy in excess of the ten mill limitation.’ My guess is that the police levy will be returning, and your vote does not matter. It appears that the thought process of the federal government that we know better than you what you need has now surfaced in Baltimore.

When Baltimore had a mayor, village council and board of public affairs, the citizen/ voters had some input into what was done in the village. Now, with a mayor, village council and village administrator, no means nothing. “We know better than you know what you need” – all they want us to do is pay for it.

In the 50 years that I have lived here, there has always been a police presence. We do need a police presence in Baltimore, and as I have stated in prior letters, I have no issues with the police department other than their failure to operate within their budget allocation. If you are a department manager and you cannot operate the department within the budget limitations, they will find a manager who can and will do it.

Since the expansion of the Baltimore Police Department appeared to be a “pet project” of the mayor and now departed village administrator, and a village council who seems afraid to say no, taxpayers will be paying for another vote on this issue.

If the levy is approved, what does that do to the budget process? What it does is to state that budgets do not matter, spend what you want, and if that is not enough, we will raise taxes.

The private sector cannot operate in that manner, for fear of bankruptcy. Why do we allow “public servants” that ability.

By the way, the sewer into Walnut Township is apparently still alive. Either our water/sewer bills or some form of taxation will pay for that project. Once the big ball starts rolling, it is hard to stop it.

Charles R. Lamb
Baltimore

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