2011-10-15 / News

Donations, sweat, volunteers build new police station

By Scott Rawdon


Millersport Police Chief John Shirk works at his desk in the new police station. More than $100,000 worth of donated materials and labor turned the former Millersport water treatment plant into the village’s first stand-alone police station. Beacon photo by Scott Rawdon. Millersport Police Chief John Shirk works at his desk in the new police station. More than $100,000 worth of donated materials and labor turned the former Millersport water treatment plant into the village’s first stand-alone police station. Beacon photo by Scott Rawdon. MILLERSPORT – They did it with a little help from their friends. Well, quite a bit of help, actually.

The new Millersport police station is complete after many months of sweat, elbow grease, and $107,015 of donated materials and man-hours. The project cost the Village of Millersport nothing. “It’s come a long way,” said Millersport Police Sergeant Mark Consolo. “(Chief John Shirk) put in countless hours.”

The Millersport Police Department transformed the village’s former water treatment plant into a new station. Consolo said the police department used to operate from a small room in the Village Offices, but more space and security measures were necessary. The former water plant, which is just across a parking lot from the Village Offices, seemed like the perfect place to establish a new station, but it was crammed full of water treatment equipment. Hundreds of manhours later, the interior bears no resemblance to the former water plant’s interior. “It’s completely been redone,” said Consolo.

“I feel strongly about law enforcement in Millersport,” said Millersport Village Council president and Buckeye Lake Marina owner Dave Levacy. Buckeye Lake Marina donated roughly $2,500 in plumbing and HVAC supplies. He said Millersport’s general fund couldn’t support creating a new police department facility. “It had to be done through donations,” said Levacy. He said the officers gave up many hours of their own time to help remodel the new station. “I don’t think (Shirk) has been given the credit due him,” said Levacy.

“They’ve done a magnificent job putting that building together on a shoe string (budget),” said Millersport council member Charles Mesko, who donated $600 worth of doors. “Any way I could help, I was happy to do.” He said crime incidents have been very low in Millersport compared to surrounding areas, which, he said, is a testament to the police department’s ability, especially considering its limited budget.

“Because we’re a local company and they needed the help,” said Brent Wohrer, owner of Millersport’s Flooring Studio who donated $4,000 worth of flooring and installation labor. He said his desire for people to understand the importance of shopping lo- cally inspired his generosity in part. “We’re just helping out around here,” said Wohrer.

Other major contributors include the Liebert Corporation of Columbus, which donated $10,000 of furniture, National Safe and Security of Millersport, which donated $6,000 in security cameras and installation, and the Fairfield Career Center of Lancaster, which donated $15,600 worth of labor for electrical installation.

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