2010-08-14 / News

Kirkersville Police chief resigns

By Scott Rawdon

KIRKERSVILLE – Kirkersville Police Chief Mark Bossa resigned his position effective Aug. 5. Kirkersville Mayor Terry Ashcraft said Bossa left for a “better paying job” at a “large security company,” but wasn’t able to be more specific.

“I’m happy for him,” said Ashcraft. “He didn’t leave under bad terms.”

Ashcraft said Bossa was willing to do both the police chief job and his new job, but decided to move on completely. Ashcraft said Bossa had to support himself and his daughter and needed a higher paying position. Bossa was hired March 12, 2009.

The mayor hopes to appoint an interim police chief by the end of the week and the Licking County Sheriff’s Office will cover the village in the meantime. He said Bossa is welcome to return to the village to offer his assistance at any time.

Bossa succeeded Kirkersville Police Chief Jim Petrey, who resigned March 2, 2009, who succeeded Chris Martin, who served as acting chief after Robert Chamberlain, the village’s pervious permanent police chief, resigned May 14, 2008.

Ashcraft added that Kirkersville auxiliary officer Jonathan Rumpff resigned his position as well. “He just resigned,” said Ashcraft.

In other Kirkersville news, Ashcraft said Kirkersville Village Council had its first of three required readings of an ordinance regulating animal confinement, dogs and other animals running at large, and abandoning domestic animals. “We have a big cat problem,” said Ashcraft.

Very basically, the ordinance prohibits pet owners from allowing pets to run free beyond the owner’s property and dogs in particular must be restrained by a leash, supervision, or a fence on the owner’s property.

The ordinance provides that domestic animals found wandering free away from its owner’s property will be impounded and its owner fined. Owners of domestic animals that are properly tagged will be notified immediately. Unidentified animals will be turned over to the Licking County Animal Shelter.

The ordinance also prohibits any domestic animal’s abandonment.

Buckeye Lake resident and animal activist Bonnie Mansfield said the ordinance, “punishes the animal and the person who has the compassion to feed the animal.”

She said an animal ordinance should require pet owners to spay or neuter their pets to stop them from reproducing. Mansfield is trying to convince the Village of Buckeye Lake to enact its own spay and neutering requirement.

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